Gang stalking fliers, Texas, police lies and disinformation, fentanyl hoax, the 13s, FightGangStalking.com

There are an incredibly few websites online that maintain a reputable narrative about organized gangstalking.

But: of those few, http://www.fightgangstalking.com is an opinion leader that manages to separate the dialectic into its necessary two categories of OGS denialists, and OGS victims, while creating safe space between obvious police and military influence/psychological operations like OSI informers:

So: the two categories of Organized Gang Stalking participants online are

1. gang stalking denialists, disinformation,misinformation, and psycho/sociopathic military and police, and NGO affiliated or crisis PR sponsored bullies, trolls, and hackers/harassers like this case here, or this one, and especially these examples here

2 actual, verifiable cases of organized gangstalking and actual victims who were hacked, stalked, and harrassed by any number of institution level slander campaigns such aswhen the “gay mafia,” and academics gang stalk dissidents, and or even murdered as we saw in the case of Mathew Riehl, an Iraq war veteran,who was framed as being mentally ill, ratherthanbeinga man who stood for Constitutional rights.

In that light, Texas police have inadvertently given actual victims of their illegal “high policing” tactical assault on dueprocess a boost: they appear to have waged an incredibly stupid media hoax, replete with the signs and symbols of Jewish-christian/cult unspecified, as we see again and again and again, these occulted police/intelligence agency and others use that number online to signal to each other.

Related Story: Organized gang stalking denialists, such as Dr. Lorraine Sheridan, and other trans-humanists frequently cite aninymous polls,.or reference statistics that they pull out of their asses, and the number 13 and the arbitrary “ten thousand,”appear frequently in their online work in media. Use ROGS search feature to find dozens of examples, or this one, particularly.

But dont take my word for it- ask FGS, whose blog has gotten some 400000 views since it has been around.

And,whose information and analyses borders on solid AP styled magazine type reporting,according to any and all reputable sources.

In that light, the ROGS blog-this one you are reading-has tossed the salad of journalistic ethics,and deliberately flaunts the rules,because writing live in a mirrored WordPress blogis.like writing from a live-fire zone.

And so, I lifted this story about Texas police, and gang stalking fliers, and fentanyl hoaxing entirely from FGS, because hesaid it better than I could:
July 6, 2018

The curious case of the Fentanyl flyers

When high-profile organizations and individuals call attention to unethical and illegal activities in the security and intelligence industry, it creates public relations problems for that industry. A good example is the campaign described in the June 13th posting below. Another is the support by professional athletes of the Black Lives Matter movement. Sometimes the damage is countered by apologist politicians and a friendly corporate press. Social media corporations also help by purging messages which are deemed excessively radical.

Some types of unwanted exposure get handled differently, though. Among the simplest and most effective ways to mitigate the damage from revelations, claims, and criticisms about corruption in the surveillance and policing business is to spread disinformation to discredit and marginalize those criticisms and allegations. Especially helpful, from the perspective of a subset of employees in the security industry, are efforts to associate all discussion of “disruption” operations (extreme harassment by public and/or private security goons) with being stupid, paranoid, and dangerous.

In reality, no one who is familiar with the clandestine activities of the security-intelligence business, and who is being honest with you, would deny that some government agents and private security operatives sometimes engage in long-term, undercover surveillance that’s combined with relentless, but mostly-inconspicuous, harassment. Links posted on this site feature several non-disputed, published news reports and official communications which refer to such matters. Call the practice what you want; differences of opinion and speculation among informed professionals on this subject would involve the structure and scope of such operations, not whether they exist.

Occasionally, as with the FBI’s COINTELPRO scandal, systematic crimes perpetrated by law enforcement agents and their private associates get exposed. The COINTELPRO revelations, though, required some exceptionally brave and clever citizens breaking into an FBI office and stealing secret files. In between such rare events – the Pentagon Papers was another – the public is mostly in the dark. But sometimes, things start to appear on the fringe of the media – curious references to “organized stalking” and such. And you have to wonder.

Some observations about leaflets: Because of their physical (non-digital) nature, (a) leaflets get noticed by the recipients, and (b) their distribution is difficult to interfere with inconspicuously. Further, because of First Amendment protections traditionally associated with leafleting, suppression of that form of speech can also be legally difficult. Consequently, paper and ink, even in the modern digital world, can be a perfect means to convey information about corruption. Although the scale of distribution – and the cost – is small, it’s highly disruptive.

Judge for yourself whether such motives and concerns were the source of what happened – or was staged – last week in Houston, Texas. Keep in mind that the website you’re now reading – like the website in this story – includes flyers intended to be printed and distributed to discourage, through public exposure, criminal harassment by corrupt cops and corrupt private security investigators.

Even without the benefit of social media promotion or commercial support, the website you’re now reading has been visited more than half a million times. Perhaps some people would be happy to see this site – and its tactical advice, such as advocacy of spreading flyers – discredited by associating it with a ridiculous disinformation website.

TV news reports on June 26th (KPRC Houston, Channel 2 and KRIS Corpus Christi, Channel 6), indicated – initially – that someone (or several people) had apparently distributed some flyers laced with Fentanyl – a drug far more powerful than morphine, and associated with numerous overdose deaths. The toxic flyers had been placed on approximately a dozen vehicles parked on the street, outside a Harris County sheriff’s station at 601 Lockwood Drive.

According to the apparently-official version of what happened, the notion that the flyers were laced with Fentanyl arose when a sergeant at the scene reported that she was feeling “light-headed.” She was taken to a hospital to get checked out. The initial reports were vague on how sheriff’s officials determined the toxic nature of the flyers, and about the medical treatment.

Aaron Barker and Jacob Rascon at KPRC Houston:

“The sergeant removed one of the flyers from her windshield and later began feeling light-headed, according to Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez. She started driving herself to a hospital, but pulled over when she started feeling sick. A lieutenant met her and drove her to the Houston Northwest Medical Center.”

A website called “Targeted Justice” is the apparent origin of the flyers (the flyers can be printed from that website). This is their Twitter page. The document seems to feature diagrams of mind-control ray guns or something. If you’re interested, you can probably download it from them (whoever they are). The official photo of the flyers (below) was provided to the press, and posted on KPRC’s website with this caption: “Deputies released these images of flyers that they said were placed on some vehicles at a Harris County Sheriff’s Office facility June 26, 2018, in Houston.”

Official image

My initial reaction to this photo was this: Given America’s massive post-9/11 security spending binge, why do Harris County detectives have to take their evidence photos using a cell phone made in 2002? Maybe we should we hold a bake sale to raise money, so they can better equip themselves. On second thought, though, I decided that the image is appropriately obscure, given the whole nature of this incident.

A second observation about this story: A street in front of a sheriff’s office is a remarkably bold choice of location to anonymously place strange leaflets. The Google Maps street view of the address seems to confirm the unlikeliness of the area as a venue for radical pamphleteers. Also, the flyers were reportedly distributed in the middle of the day (approximately 1 pm, according to a June 29th update from KHOU Houston, Channel 11). If someone other than a cop had been there, milling about in very close proximity to the government vehicles parked there, that person would have appeared suspicious even if he or she were not distributing flyers about ray guns and such.

Another thought I had upon seeing this news: Since, in effect, we were being invited to believe that someone – or several people – apparently attempted to poison American law enforcement personnel – in an attack which also involved the distribution of strange flyers, presumably, the FBI is all over this – you know, because of that whole “terrorism” thing. Although the reporting made no mention of any federal agencies, I presumed we would hear something soon.

In the meantime, as reported on June 28th by KTRK Houston, Channel 13, the Harris County Sheriff’s Office responded promptly to the grave new threat posed by the Fentanyl-laced flyers. They tweeted the above photo of the flyer, on the day of the incident, with the following message:

warning tweet

KTRK reporter Marla Carter also recognized the severity of the danger:

The tough part for investigators is that it could have been anyone who printed and passed out these flyers. The only clues on the flyers themselves may be fingerprints. “Someone could have died. The fact it is now being used against officers is a game-changer,” said Harris Co. Pct. 1 Constable Alan Rosen.

Several other local law enforcement agencies are trying to stay on top of the game by arming officers with Narcan, an emergency treatment used for opioid overdoses.

The encounter with Fentanyl can be deadly even if found on a flyer and absorbed through the skin.

The same news report noted that “Targeted Justice” (whatever that actually is) acknowledged authoring the flyer, but denied any involvement in the leafleting in Houston:

The organization listed on the flyers, Targeted Justice, says it had nothing to do with incident. They believe that the flyers were printed off of their website.

So that might have ruled out a few possible suspects, but the dangerous pamphleteer remained unknown. Don’t worry though, because – surprise! – it turned out that the Fentanyl was fictional. A news update from KTRK Houston, Channel 13, on Friday, June 29th:

“After warning the public about flyers potentially tainted with the opioid Fentanyl, the Harris County Sheriff’s Office now confirms lab tests showed no signs of the drug.

“The Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences tested 13 flyers and found all of them came back negative.”

“…In addition to testing the 13 flyers, the lab also tested clothing items, and blood and urine samples collected from the sergeant. Those tests also were negative for the drug.”

Here’s some additional good news: If you live in Houston, don’t worry about the technical skills of your law enforcement officers. The KTRK article helpfully explains that the mistake didn’t arise from professional incompetence (or the fact that the whole matter appears to have been staged), but rather, from “an abundance of caution.” I find it difficult to read that phrase without hearing it in George Carlin’s sarcastic voice.

The odd phenomenon of countless vague, paranoia websites, of which “Targeted Justice” is an example, is chronicled in detail in several places on the site you’re now reading. The trend ought to seem curious, by the way. Apparently, these websites sort of sprang up out of nowhere, and have proliferated like mushrooms, despite never being interesting – let alone credible. Did something get into the water supply?

Here’s a tip-off that someone is trying very hard to appear crazy. The image below is from the “Who to follow” section of Targeted Justice’s Twitter page. The glowing brain image is essentially an icon for “I’m a nut!”
Targeted Justice Twitter page cropped

Alternatively, an actually-crazy person is still at large, wandering around Houston and maybe distributing more flyers. Remember: this is also someone who can approach a sheriff’s station, for example, distribute pamphlets (or whatever), and depart unseen, in the middle of the day, like some kind of ninja. From the June 29 KTRK report:

“The sheriff’s office has not questioned any persons of interest in the case, and no criminal charges have been filed.”

For private citizens in America, the lesson of this story is that some security-intelligence officials appear to have concerns about the potentially disruptive effects of flyers which call attention to illegal surveillance and harassment.

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