Homeless and gang stalking: a major theme has an articulate cause-police corruption and real estate

Gang stalking and real estate and police corruption

One of the interesting things about what is often referred to online as “organized gang stalking” is that there are frequent references to both real estate and the fact that the “gang stalkers” will try to make you lose your house, or cause you to rent property to criminals, and thus, force an asset forfeiture, or other default. That essentially, the ‘perps’ will make you homeless.

Homelessness is a major theme in most if not all gang stalking narratives that discuss this. In the most famous case of gang stalking Stockton city manager Bob Deis literally had the police union buy the house next to him from where they waged a war of attrition, because Deis sought to save the citizens some money.

And also, the case of the Krlich’s of Ohio, where we see that today, they are suing the fire chief and the local police who waged a ten year long campaign of harassment whereby these city actors honked their horns in front of the Krlich’s house, sometimes one hundred times per day(TEN YEARS).

Here below is a snapshot of some more police corruption that employs not only ‘gang stalking’ tactics, but particularly ‘organized’ crime stalking to gain unethical advantage and real estate by essentially putting the squeeze on mobsters, or by doing business with them in shady transactions. The story below is some excellent reporting by Bob Lewis of WNYC news:

https://www.wnyc.org/story/politicians-loan-shark-and-piles-money-one-top-nypd-cops-tangled-web/

A Missing Loan Shark, Some Politicians, and Piles of Money: One Top NYPD Cop’s Tangled Web

In April 2010, Vincent “Jimmy” Durso — a devoted family man and small-time loan shark — dropped off his wife’s home health aide in the Morrisania neighborhood of the Bronx. Four days later, police found Durso’s black Honda Accord parked on a shaded street a dozen blocks away near Crotona Park.

He was never heard from again.

For his family, it was a tragedy; his daughter hired a private investigator and even a psychic to help find him. For detectives it was a mystery: Was it the result of dementia, or a worse fate for a man who kept $30,000 cash in a jacket?

But for one top NYPD cop, it was a business opportunity. Assistant Chief Edward Delatorre Jr. bought two of Durso’s investment properties from the man’s grieving daughter at a below market price — while detectives were still investigating the disappearance.

No one involved in the Durso sale would talk to WNYC, so there’s no way to determine how Chief Delatorre came to buy the property. At best it was simply the case of a broker bringing the Durso’s together with Delatorre and his wife, who is herself a licensed broker.

At worst?

“Is he capitalizing on knowledge of the value or undervalue of such a property that he was able to come in with insider knowledge and profit as a result of the man’s death?” said Dick Dadey, executive director of good government group Citizens Union. “That’s an egregious conflict of interest.”

WNYC reviewed six years’ worth of financial disclosure forms for more than 200 high-ranking NYPD officials who had to file such information with the city’s Conflicts of Interest Board.  About three dozen reported outside income. Dozens more are wealthy investors.

For more on cops cashing in on illicit opportunities, check out the series “NYPD Inc.”
http://www.wnyc.org/series/nypd-inc

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